Document Detail


Eating-related thought suppression in high and low disinhibitors.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11746294     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effects of the attempts by high and low disinhibitors to suppress thoughts about food and eating. METHOD: Seventy-seven females who differed in level of disinhibition were asked to monitor their thoughts about food and eating for three 5-min periods. Participants were administered either a suppression or a nonsuppression instruction relating to thoughts about food and eating. The number of food-related thoughts were recorded. Self-report ratings of anxiety, distress, perceived frequency of thoughts, control over thoughts, and strategies used to control thoughts were also obtained. RESULTS: Low disinhibitors who were instructed to suppress had more food-related thoughts than high disinhibitors who were instructed to suppress. The reverse was true in the nonsuppression condition. High disinhibitors reported higher levels of anxiety and distress. Furthermore, high disinhibitors had less difficulty controlling their thoughts than low disinhibitors when asked to suppress, whereas the reverse was true when they did not receive suppression instructions. Thought control strategies were found to correlate significantly with anxiety ratings, self-reported frequency of intrusions, actual number of thought intrusions, and distress. DISCUSSION: High disinhibitors are able to successfully suppress their thoughts about food and eating, at least across relatively short periods of time. However, there appears to be associated negative consequences.
Authors:
K G Oliver; G F Huon
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The International journal of eating disorders     Volume:  30     ISSN:  0276-3478     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Eat Disord     Publication Date:  2001 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-12-17     Completed Date:  2002-01-04     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8111226     Medline TA:  Int J Eat Disord     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  329-37     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. k.oliver@student.unsw.edu.au
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety
Behavior Therapy
Cognition*
Eating Disorders / psychology*
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)*
Internal-External Control*
Stress, Psychological

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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