Document Detail


Early developments and clinical applications of total parenteral nutrition.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12903895     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: This article recounts the conditions and status of surgical nutrition support in the 1960s and the antecedent basic and clinical investigational work leading to the development of a practical and efficacious method of adequate nourishment entirely by vein in Beagle puppies; describes the subsequent clinical application of the knowledge, techniques, and technology to the first successful long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support of critically ill pediatric and adult patients; and admonishes nutritionists of all backgrounds that some need for parenteral nutrition will likely always exist and that it is incumbent upon everyone to continue endeavors to advance the germinal methodology to perfection. METHODS: The relevant indications, limitations, hindrances, motivational factors, and studies regarding the development of TPN are reviewed, and the fundamental investigational work culminating in the first successful growth and development of Beagle puppies and a human infant fed entirely by vein are described firsthand. The details of the orderly and logical scientific development of the principles and components of the techniques in animals, infants, and adults are related. RESULTS: Knowledge, techniques, and technologic constituents of the first successful long-term TPN system were developed in the basic biochemical and animal laboratories initially in 6 puppies and subsequently adapted clinically for the efficacious long-term i.v. support of 6 critically ill surgical adult patients and a newborn infant before its widespread clinical application. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term TPN was inaugurated successfully as a safe and effective i.v. feeding technique nearly 4 decades ago. However, basic and clinical investigations must continue to be encouraged, supported, and carried out in the quest to perfect the current rudimentary technology, methodology, and outcomes.
Authors:
Stanley J Dudrick
Related Documents :
3596055 - Inhibition of the eyeblink reflex in the human infant.
3522195 - Long term postnatal development of insulin secretion in early premature infants.
6546445 - Nutrition for full-term and preterm infants. meeting normal and exceptional needs.
23470355 - Do infants really expect agents to act efficiently? a critical test of the rationality ...
23669525 - Short-term gestation, long-term risk: prematurity and chronic kidney disease.
8777655 - Ultrasound findings and clinical antecedents of cerebral palsy in very preterm infants.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Historical Article; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition     Volume:  27     ISSN:  0148-6071     ISO Abbreviation:  JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr     Publication Date:    2003 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-08-07     Completed Date:  2003-11-04     Revised Date:  2007-02-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7804134     Medline TA:  JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  291-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Program in Surgery, St. Mary's Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, Waterbury, Connecticut 06706, USA. sdudrick@stmh.org
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Catheterization / instrumentation
Critical Illness / therapy
Dogs
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Nutritional Support / history
Osmolar Concentration
Parenteral Nutrition, Total / adverse effects,  history*
Postoperative Care
Preoperative Care
Solutions
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Solutions

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Joint Commission for Accreditation of Health Care Organizations guidelines: too late to intervene fo...
Next Document:  "2-6-11" motif in heat shock protein 60 and central nervous system antigens: a preliminary...