Document Detail


Early child care and adiposity at ages 1 and 3 years.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19651579     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The majority of infants in the United States are in nonparental child care, yet little is known about the effect of child care on development of obesity.
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between child care attendance from birth to 6 months and adiposity at 1 and 3 years of age.
METHODS: We studied 1138 children from a prospective cohort of pregnant women and their offspring. The main exposure was time in child care from birth to 6 months of age, overall and by type of care: (1) child care center; (2) someone else's home; and (3) child's own home by nonparent. The main outcomes were weight-for-length (WFL) z score at 1 year and BMI z score at 3 years of age.
RESULTS: A total of 649 (57%) infants attended child care; 17% were cared for in a center, 27% in someone else's home, and 21% in their own home by a nonparent. After adjustment for confounders, overall time in child care was associated with an increased WFL z score at 1 year and BMI z score at 3 years of age but not skinfold thicknesses. Center and own home care were not associated with the outcomes, but care in someone else's home was associated with an increase in both the 1- and 3-year outcomes.
CONCLUSION: Child care in the first 6 months of life, especially in someone else's home, was associated with an increased WFL z score at 1 year and BMI z score at 3 years of age.
Authors:
Sara E Benjamin; Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman; Elsie M Taveras; Jess Haines; Jonathan Finkelstein; Ken Kleinman; Matthew W Gillman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2009-07-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  124     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2009 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-08-04     Completed Date:  2009-08-13     Revised Date:  2013-06-02    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  555-62     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Obesity Prevention Program, Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. sara_benjamin@harvardpilgrim.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Body Mass Index
Breast Feeding
Child Care / statistics & numerical data*
Child Day Care Centers / statistics & numerical data*
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Massachusetts
Obesity / epidemiology*,  etiology*
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Skinfold Thickness
Statistics as Topic
Weight Gain
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
F32 DK080618-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; HD 34568/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HL 64925/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL 68041/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
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