Document Detail


Early Skin-to-Skin Care in Extremely Preterm Infants: Thermal Balance and Care Environment.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22497906     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate infant thermal balance and the physical environment in extremely preterm infants during skin-to-skin care (SSC). STUDY DESIGN: Measurements were performed in 26 extremely preterm infants (gestational age 22-26 weeks; postnatal age, 2-9 days) during pretest (in incubator), test (during SSC), and posttest (in incubator) periods. Infants' skin temperature and body temperature, ambient temperature, and relative humidity were measured. Evaporimetry was used to determine transepidermal water loss, and insensible water loss through the skin was calculated. RESULTS: The infants maintained a normal body temperature during SSC. Transfer to and from SSC was associated with a drop in skin temperature, which increased during SSC. Ambient humidity and temperature were lower during SSC than during incubator care. Insensible water loss through the skin was higher during SSC. CONCLUSION: SSC can be safely used in extremely preterm infants. SSC can be initiated during the first week of life and is feasible in infants requiring neonatal intensive care, including ventilator treatment. During SSC, the conduction of heat from parent to infant is sufficiently high to compensate for the increase in evaporative and convective heat loss. The increased water loss through the skin during SSC is small and should not affect the infant's fluid balance.
Authors:
Victoria Karlsson; Ann-Britt Heinemann; Gunnar Sjörs; Kerstin Hedberg Nykvist; Johan Agren
Related Documents :
18219516 - Critically ill newborns with multiple organ dysfunction: assessment by neomod score in ...
15682206 - Bias measuring mortality gradients by occupational class in new zealand.
12319016 - Summary evaluations of risk factors related to infant mortality.
19629906 - Neonatal and childhood mortality rates in myanmar.
576786 - Gestational development of brain.
9679266 - Childhood, infant and perinatal mortality, 1996; social and biological factors in death...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-4-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of pediatrics     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1097-6833     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-4-13     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375410     Medline TA:  J Pediatr     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Risk factors and outcome of acute severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease.
Next Document:  A Prospective Study of Cutaneous Findings in Newborns in the United States: Correlation with Race, E...