Document Detail


Is Dutch swimming pool water erosive?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14768239     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Etiological factors in the development of dental erosion are usually listed as dietary acids, for instance in soft drinks and fruit juices, and intrinsic acid exposure due to gastro-intestinal disease or frequent vomiting. Quite often the list of causes in reviews and textbooks also includes frequent swimming. This paper evaluates the evidence behind this erosion etiology. The main disinfection techniques using gas chlorination and sodium hypochlorite are described, and their relative risk for development of low pH water is discussed. In the Netherlands only the relatively safe sodium hypochlorite method is used, and the quality of the water in public swimming pools is monitored monthly by independent test laboratories. Data for 2001 from such a test laboratory show that the percentage of low-pH results is very low (0.14%). It is concluded that the risk of dental erosion from frequent swimming in acidic pool water is probably negligible in the Netherlands.
Authors:
P A Lokin; M C Huysmans
Publication Detail:
Type:  English Abstract; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nederlands tijdschrift voor tandheelkunde     Volume:  111     ISSN:  0028-2200     ISO Abbreviation:  Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd     Publication Date:  2004 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-02-10     Completed Date:  2004-03-02     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0400771     Medline TA:  Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  dut     Pagination:  14-6     Citation Subset:  D    
Affiliation:
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1 9713 AV Groningen.
Vernacular Title:
Is Nederlands zwembadwater erosief?
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Swimming
Swimming Pools*
Tooth Erosion / etiology*
Water / chemistry*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
7732-18-5/Water

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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