Document Detail


Duodenum electrical stimulation delays gastric emptying, reduces food intake and accelerates small bowel transit in pigs.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20948518     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Duodenum electrical stimulation (DES) has been shown to delay gastric emptying and reduce food intake in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DES on gastric emptying, small bowel transit and food intake in pigs, a large animal model of obesity. The study consisted of three experiments (gastric emptying, small bowel transit, and food intake) in pigs implanted with internal duodenal electrodes for DES and one or two duodenal cannulas for gastric emptying and small bowel transit. We found that (i) gastric emptying was dose-dependently delayed by DES of different stimulation parameters; (ii) small bowel transit was significantly accelerated with continuous DES in proximal intestine but not with intermittent DES; (iii) DES significantly reduced body weight gain with 100% duty cycle (DC), but not with DES with 40% DC. A marginal difference was noted in food intake among 100% DC session, 40% DC session, and control session. DES with long pulses energy-dependently inhibits gastric emptying in pigs. DES with appropriate parameters accelerates proximal small bowel transit in pigs. DES reduces body weight gain in obese pigs, and this therapeutic effect on obesity is mediated by inhibiting gastric emptying and food intake, and may also possibly by accelerating intestinal transit. DES may have a potential application to treat patients with obesity.
Authors:
Xiaohong Xu; Yong Lei; Jiande D Z Chen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-10-14
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)     Volume:  19     ISSN:  1930-739X     ISO Abbreviation:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-01-31     Completed Date:  2011-04-29     Revised Date:  2012-08-13    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101264860     Medline TA:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  442-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Veterans Research and Education Foundation, VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Duodenum / physiopathology*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Energy Intake / physiology*
Female
Gastric Emptying / physiology*
Gastrointestinal Transit / physiology*
Humans
Obesity / therapy*
Swine
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK063733/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Jun;19(6):1317

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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