Document Detail


Dopamine and binge eating behaviors.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20417658     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Central dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the motivational aspects of eating and food choices. This review focuses on human and animal data investigating the importance of dopamine on binge eating behaviors. Early work examining dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of bulimic individuals suggested decreased dopamine turnover during the active phase of the illness. While neuroimaging studies of dopamine mechanisms in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are limited, genetic studies in humans have implicated an increased frequency of dopamine transporter and associated D2 receptor polymorphisms with binge pathology. Recent studies in rodent models of dietary-induced binge eating (DIBE) have investigated plausible dopamine mechanisms involved in sustaining binge eating behaviors. In DIBE models, highly palatable foods (fats, sugars and their combination), as well as restricted access conditions appear to promote ingestive responses and result in sustained dopamine stimulation within the nucleus accumbens. Taken together with studies on the comorbidity of illicit drug use and eating disorders, the data reviewed here support a role for dopamine in perpetuating the compulsive feeding patterns of BN and BED. As such, we propose that sustained stimulation of the dopamine systems by bingeing promoted by preexisting conditions (e.g., genetic traits, dietary restraint, stress, etc.) results in progressive impairments of dopamine signaling. To disrupt this vicious cycle, novel research-based treatment options aiming at the neural substrates of compulsive eating patterns are necessary.
Authors:
Nicholas T Bello; Andras Hajnal
Related Documents :
15001068 - Dietary restraint, attributional styles for eating, and preloading effects.
12880618 - Ambiguity of 'snack' in british usage.
16335778 - Food habits of the egyptians: newly emerging trends.
10616658 - Food aversions in eating disorders.
19543718 - Quantitative methods for food allergens: a review.
9246028 - Gastroesophageal reflux in achalasia. when is reflux really reflux?
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review     Date:  2010-04-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior     Volume:  97     ISSN:  1873-5177     ISO Abbreviation:  Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-11     Completed Date:  2011-09-15     Revised Date:  2014-09-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0367050     Medline TA:  Pharmacol Biochem Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  25-33     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Bulimia / metabolism,  physiopathology*,  psychology*
Caloric Restriction / methods,  psychology
Dopamine / metabolism,  physiology*
Humans
Receptors, Dopamine D2 / metabolism,  physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DC000240/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; DK078484/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; DK080899/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DC000240/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; R01 DK080899/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Receptors, Dopamine D2; VTD58H1Z2X/Dopamine
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Shape and individual variability of the blur adaptation curve.
Next Document:  Cannabis with high ?9-THC contents affects perception and visual selective attention acutely: an eve...