Document Detail


Domestic violence and early childhood mortality in rural India: evidence from prospective data.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20444839     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between domestic violence and perinatal, neonatal and infant mortality in rural India using prospective data.
METHODS: The study is based upon a prospective follow-up study of a cohort selected from the 1998-99 National Family and Health Survey-2 (NSFS-2), which was carried out in 2002-03 in four Indian states. Data for a total of 3909 birth outcomes that took place during this 4-year period were analysed using bivariate analysis and hazards regression analysis to control for truncated observations and possible other confounding factors. Findings After controlling for other potentially confounding factors, births to mothers who experienced two or more episodes of recent domestic violence experienced higher perinatal [hazards ratio (HR) = 1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12, 2.79] and neonatal (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.11, 2.53) mortality, relative to births to women whose mothers reported no violence. Overall, these births to women who experienced violence had 68% higher risk of infant mortality compared with the 'no violence' group. Births to women who experienced a single episode of violence were not at higher risk of mortality.
CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides additional and more conclusive evidence on the importance of domestic violence for early childhood mortality in low-resource settings such as rural India. The results argue for a greater focus upon such violence within current child survival programmes.
Authors:
Michael A Koenig; Rob Stephenson; Rajib Acharya; Lindsay Barrick; Saifuddin Ahmed; Michelle Hindin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-05-05
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of epidemiology     Volume:  39     ISSN:  1464-3685     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Epidemiol     Publication Date:  2010 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-05-31     Completed Date:  2010-09-14     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7802871     Medline TA:  Int J Epidemiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  825-33     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Child
Child Mortality / ethnology*
Child Welfare
Domestic Violence / ethnology,  statistics & numerical data*
Family Health / ethnology*
Health Surveys
Humans
India / epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Rural Population / statistics & numerical data*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01HD039405/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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