Document Detail


Does involvement in food preparation track from adolescence to young adulthood and is it associated with better dietary quality? Findings from a 10-year longitudinal study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22124458     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To examine whether involvement in food preparation tracks over time, between adolescence (15-18 years), emerging adulthood (19-23 years) and the mid-to-late twenties (24-28 years), as well as 10-year longitudinal associations between home food preparation, dietary quality and meal patterning.
DESIGN: Population-based, longitudinal cohort study.
SETTING: Participants were originally sampled from Minnesota public secondary schools (USA).
SUBJECTS: Participants enrolled in Project EAT (Eating Among Teens and Young Adults)-I, EAT-II and EAT-III (n 1321).
RESULTS: Most participants in their mid-to-late twenties reported an enjoyment of cooking (73 % of males, 80 % of females); however, few prepared meals including vegetables most days of the week (24 % of males, 41 % of females). Participants in their mid-to-late twenties who enjoyed cooking were more likely to have engaged in food preparation as adolescents and emerging adults (P < 0·01); those who frequently prepared meals including vegetables were more likely to have engaged in food preparation as emerging adults (P < 0·001), but not as adolescents. Emerging adult food preparation predicted better dietary quality five years later in the mid-to-late twenties, including higher intakes of fruit, vegetables and dark green/orange vegetables, and less sugar-sweetened beverage and fast-food consumption. Associations between adolescent food preparation and later dietary quality yielded few significant results.
CONCLUSIONS: Food preparation behaviours appeared to track over time and engagement in food preparation during emerging adulthood, but not adolescence, was associated with healthier dietary intake during the mid-to-late twenties. Intervention studies are needed to understand whether promoting healthy food preparation results in improvements in eating patterns during the transition to adulthood.
Authors:
Melissa N Laska; Nicole I Larson; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer; Mary Story
Related Documents :
21848128 - Associations between household food insecurity and health outcomes in the aboriginal po...
22107598 - The transmission of attitudes towards food: twofold specificity of similarities with pa...
25174658 - Foods confiscated from non-eu flights as a neglected route of potential methicillin-res...
21612878 - Peptide biomarkers as a way to determine meat authenticity.
23171378 - Diversity, distribution and sources of bacteria in residential kitchens.
9925618 - Changes in bacterial and eukaryotic community structure after mass lysis of filamentous...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2011-11-29
Journal Detail:
Title:  Public health nutrition     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1475-2727     ISO Abbreviation:  Public Health Nutr     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-15     Completed Date:  2013-03-28     Revised Date:  2013-07-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9808463     Medline TA:  Public Health Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1150-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 S. 2nd Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. mnlaska@umn.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Adult
Beverages
Choice Behavior
Cooking*
Diet*
Diet Surveys
Eating
Energy Intake
Fast Foods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health Behavior*
Health Promotion
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Minnesota
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K07 CA126837/CA/NCI NIH HHS; K07CA126837/CA/NCI NIH HHS; R01 HL084064/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL084064/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Patterning Multiplex Protein Microarrays in a Single Microfluidic Channel.
Next Document:  Acid-base catalysis of N-[(morpholine)methylene]daunorubicin.