Document Detail


Does a Simple Bedside Sonographic Measurement of the Inferior Vena Cava Correlate to Central Venous Pressure?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22197199     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Bedside ultrasound has been suggested as a non-invasive modality to estimate central venous pressure (CVP). OBJECTIVE: Evaluate a simple bedside ultrasound technique to measure the diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and correlate to simultaneously measured CVP. Secondary comparisons include anatomic location, probe orientation, and phase of respiration. METHODS: An unblinded prospective observation study was performed in an emergency department and critical care unit. Subjects were a convenience sample of adult patients with a central line at the superior venocaval-atrial junction. Ultrasound measured transverse and longitudinal diameters of the IVC at the subxiphoid, suprailiac, and mid-abdomen, each measured at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Correlation and regression analysis were used to relate CVP and IVC diameters. RESULTS: There were 72 subjects with a mean age of 67 years (range 21-94 years), 37 (53%) male, enrolled over 9 months. Seven subjects were excluded for tricuspid valvulopathy. Primary diagnoses were: respiratory failure 12 (18%), sepsis 11 (17%), and pancreatitis 3 (5%). There were 28 (43%) patients mechanically ventilated. Adequate measurements were obtainable in 57 (89%) using the subxiphoid, in 44 (68%) using the mid-abdomen, and in 28 (43%) using the suprailiac views. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant at 0.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26-0.66), 0.51 (95% CI 0.23-0.71), and 0.50 (95% CI 0.14-0.74) for end-inspiratory longitudinal subxiphoid, midpoint, and suprailiac views, respectively. Transverse values were statistically significant at 0.42 (95% CI 0.18-0.61), 0.38 (95% CI 0.09-0.61), and 0.67 (95% CI 0.40-0.84), respectively. End-expiratory measurements gave similar or slightly less significant values. CONCLUSION: The subxiphoid was the most reliably viewed of the three anatomic locations; however, the suprailiac view produced superior correlations to the CVP. Longitudinal views generally outperformed transverse views. A simple ultrasound measure of the IVC yields weak correlation to the CVP.
Authors:
Robert A De Lorenzo; Michael J Morris; Justin B Williams; Timothy F Haley; Timothy M Straight; Victoria L Holbrook-Emmons; Juanita S Medina
Related Documents :
14530989 - Effects of induced hypothermia after soft-tissue injury.
19193889 - Odor-evoked oxygen consumption by action potential and synaptic transmission in the olf...
8093829 - The use of dopexamine hydrochloride to increase oxygen delivery perioperatively.
21895099 - Verification of two minimally invasive methods for the estimation of the contact pressu...
16081609 - Cardiorespiratory adjustments of homing pigeons to steady wind tunnel flight.
16345229 - Application of oxygen-enriched aeration in the conversion of glycerol to dihydroxyaceto...
6432749 - Human whole-blood oxygen affinity: effect of carbon monoxide.
23433949 - Occupational leg oedema is more reduced by antigraduated than by graduated stockings.
2453749 - Effects of intrathecal administration of methysergide, phentolamine, and pindolol on pr...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-12-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of emergency medicine     Volume:  -     ISSN:  0736-4679     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-26     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8412174     Medline TA:  J Emerg Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Published by Elsevier Inc.
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Investigation, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Emergency Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Masters Degree Program in Clinical Investigation, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Medical Reconciliation in Patients Discharged from the Emergency Department.
Next Document:  Memory rehabilitation and brain training for surgical temporal lobe epilepsy patients: a preliminary...