Document Detail


Does a shared neurobiology for foods and drugs of abuse contribute to extremes of food ingestion in anorexia and bulimia nervosa?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23380716     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Is starvation in anorexia nervosa (AN) or overeating in bulimia nervosa (BN) a form of addiction? Alternatively, why are individuals with BN more vulnerable and individuals with AN protected from substance abuse? Such questions have been generated by recent studies suggesting that there are overlapping neural circuits for foods and drugs of abuse. To determine whether a shared neurobiology contributes to eating disorders and substance abuse, this review focused on imaging studies that investigated response to tastes of food and tasks designed to characterize reward and behavioral inhibition in AN and BN. BN and those with substance abuse disorders may share dopamine D2 receptor-related vulnerabilities, and opposite findings may contribute to "protection" from substance abuse in AN. Moreover, imaging studies provide insights into executive corticostriatal processes related to extraordinary inhibition and self-control in AN and diminished inhibitory self-control in BN that may influence the rewarding aspect of palatable foods and likely other consummatory behaviors. AN and BN tend to have premorbid traits, such as perfectionism and anxiety that make them vulnerable to using extremes of food ingestion, which serve to reduce negative mood states. Dysregulation within and/or between limbic and executive corticostriatal circuits contributes to such symptoms. Limited data support the hypothesis that reward and inhibitory processes may contribute to symptoms in eating disorders and addictive disorders, but little is known about the molecular biology of such mechanisms in terms of shared or independent processes.
Authors:
Walter H Kaye; Christina E Wierenga; Ursula F Bailer; Alan N Simmons; Angela Wagner; Amanda Bischoff-Grethe
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review     Date:  2013-02-04
Journal Detail:
Title:  Biological psychiatry     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1873-2402     ISO Abbreviation:  Biol. Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2013 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-16     Completed Date:  2013-10-21     Revised Date:  2014-04-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0213264     Medline TA:  Biol Psychiatry     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  836-42     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anorexia Nervosa / physiopathology*
Behavior, Addictive / physiopathology*
Brain / physiopathology*
Bulimia Nervosa / physiopathology*
Eating / physiology*
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Reward
Substance-Related Disorders / physiopathology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH042984/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH086017/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH092793/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH042984/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH092793/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R21 MH086017/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; UL1 TR000005/TR/NCATS NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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