Document Detail


Do the non-caffeine ingredients of energy drinks affect metabolic responses to heavy exercise?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23037611     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
ABSTRACT: Energy drinks (ED) such as Red Bull (RB) are marketed to enhance metabolism. Secondary ingredients of EDs (e.g., taurine) have been purported to improve time-trial performance; however, little research exists on how such secondary ingredients affect aerobic metabolism during heavy exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the secondary ingredients of RB on aerobic metabolism during and subsequent to heavy exercise. In double-blind, counterbalanced, and crossover fashion, 8 recreationally trained individuals completed a graded exercise test to determine the gas exchange threshold (GET). Subjects returned on two separate occasions and ingested either an 245 ml serving of RB or a control (CTRL) drink with the equivalent caffeine prior to engaging in two, 10-min constant-load cycling bouts, at an intensity equivalent to GET, with 3 min of rest between bouts. Accumulated liters of O2 (10 min) was higher for the first (17.1 ± 3.5 L) versus the second (16.7 ± 3.5 L) bout but did not differ between drinks. Similarly, excess post-exercise oxygen consumption was higher following the initial (RB: 2.6 ± 0.85 L; CTRL mean: 2.9 ± 0.90 L) versus second bout (RB mean: 1.5 ± 0.85 L; CTRL: 1.9 ± 0.87 L) but did not differ between drinks. No differences occurred between drinks for measures of heart rate or rating of perceived exertion. These results indicate that the secondary ingredients contained in a single serving of RB do not augment aerobic metabolism during or subsequent to heavy exercise.
Authors:
Robert W Pettitt; Jolynne D Niemeyer; Patrick J Sexton; Amanda Lipetzky; Steven R Murray
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-10-3
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1533-4287     ISO Abbreviation:  J Strength Cond Res     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-5     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9415084     Medline TA:  J Strength Cond Res     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Human Performance Minnesota State University, Mankato.
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