Document Detail


Distribution of phthalate esters in a marine aquatic food web: comparison to polychlorinated biphenyls.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15112801     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Dialkyl phthalate esters (DPEs) are widely used chemicals, with over 4 million tonnes being produced worldwide each year. On the basis of their octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow), which range from 10(1.61) for dimethyl phthalate to 10(9.46) for di-iso-decyl phthalate, certain phthalate esters have the potential to bioconcentrate and biomagnify in aquatic food webs. However, there are no reported field studies on the trophodynamics of phthalate ester in aquatic food webs. This study reports the distribution of 8 individual phthalate esters (i.e., dimethyl, diethyl, di-isobutyl, di-n-butyl, butylbenzyl, di(2-ethylhexyl), di-n-octyl, and di-n-nonyl) and 5 commercial isomeric mixtures (i.e., di-iso-hexyl (C6), di-iso-heptyl (C7), di-iso-octyl (C8), di-iso-nonyl (C9), and di-iso-decyl (C10)) in a marine aquatic food web. DPE concentrations were determined in 18 marine species, representing approximately 4 trophic levels. Co-analysis of DPEs and 6 PCB congeners (i.e., PCB-18, 99, 118, 180, 194, and 209) in all samples produced a direct comparison of the bioaccumulation behavior of PCBs and DPEs. Lipid equivalent concentrations of the PCBs increased with increasing trophic position and stable isotope ratios (delta15N). The Food-Web Magnification Factor (FWMF) of the PCB congeners ranged from 1.8 to 9.5. Lipid equivalent concentrations of low and intermediate molecular weight DPEs (i.e., C1-C7 DPEs: dimethyl, diethyl, di-iso-butyl, di-n-butyl, benzylbutyl, and C6 and C7 isomers) did not exhibit statistically significant trends with trophic position or stable nitrogen isotope ratios (delta15N) in the food web and FWMFs were not significantly different from 1. Lipid equivalent concentrations of the high-molecular-weight DPEs (i.e., C8-C10 DPEs: di(2-ethylhexyl), di-n-octyl, di-n-nonyl, C8, C9, and C10) declined significantly with increasing trophic position and stable isotope ratios (delta15N), producing FWMFs between 0.25 and 0.48. These results show that all DPEs tested did not biomagnify in the studied aquatic food web whereas PCBs did biomagnify.
Authors:
Cheryl E Mackintosh; Javier Maldonado; Jing Hongwu; Natasha Hoover; Audrey Chong; Michael G Ikonomou; Frank A P C Gobas
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Environmental science & technology     Volume:  38     ISSN:  0013-936X     ISO Abbreviation:  Environ. Sci. Technol.     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-04-28     Completed Date:  2004-07-08     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0213155     Medline TA:  Environ Sci Technol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2011-20     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Resource and Environmental Management, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5A 1S6.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Environmental Pollutants / analysis,  pharmacokinetics*
Esters
Food Chain*
Models, Theoretical*
Phthalic Acids / analysis,  pharmacokinetics*
Polychlorinated Biphenyls / analysis,  pharmacokinetics*
Solubility
Tissue Distribution
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Environmental Pollutants; 0/Esters; 0/Phthalic Acids; 0/Polychlorinated Biphenyls

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Methane emissions from vehicles.
Next Document:  Flux and product distribution during biological treatment of tetrachloroethene dense non-aqueous-pha...