Document Detail


Distinct opioid circuits determine the palatability and the desirability of rewarding events.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19597155     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
It generally is assumed that a common neural substrate mediates both the palatability and the reward value of nutritive events. However, recent evidence suggests this assumption may not be true. Whereas opioid circuitry in both the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum has been reported to mediate taste-reactivity responses to palatable events, the assignment of reward or inventive value to goal-directed actions has been found to involve the basolateral amygdala. Here we found that, in rats, the neural processes mediating palatability and incentive value are indeed dissociable. Naloxone infused into either the ventral pallidum or nucleus accumbens shell blocked the increase in sucrose palatability induced by an increase in food deprivation without affecting the performance of sucrose-related actions. Conversely, naloxone infused into the basolateral amygdala blocked food deprivation-induced changes in sucrose-related actions without affecting sucrose palatability. This double dissociation of opioid-mediated changes in palatability and incentive value suggests that the role of endogenous opioids in reward processing does not depend on a single neural circuit. Rather, changes in palatability and in the incentive value assigned to rewarding events seem to be mediated by distinct neural processes.
Authors:
K M Wassum; S B Ostlund; N T Maidment; B W Balleine
Related Documents :
1148875 - Partial klüver-bucy syndrome produced by destroying temporal neocortex or amygdala.
23840965 - Reciprocal interference of experimental dyslipidemia and food allergy in the evolution ...
16720395 - Are capuchin monkeys (cebus apella) inequity averse?
19955785 - Genetic variation in dopaminergic reward in humans.
7506975 - Galanin antagonists block galanin-induced feeding in the hypothalamus and amygdala of t...
15641075 - Intake of purine-rich foods, protein, and dairy products and relationship to serum leve...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2009-07-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America     Volume:  106     ISSN:  1091-6490     ISO Abbreviation:  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.     Publication Date:  2009 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-08-11     Completed Date:  2009-09-28     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505876     Medline TA:  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  12512-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Feeding Behavior / physiology*
Food Deprivation / physiology
Food Preferences / physiology*
Globus Pallidus / drug effects,  metabolism,  physiology
Male
Naloxone / pharmacology
Narcotic Antagonists / pharmacology
Neural Pathways / physiology
Nucleus Accumbens / drug effects,  metabolism,  physiology
Rats
Rats, Long-Evans
Receptors, Opioid / antagonists & inhibitors,  metabolism,  physiology*
Reward*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DA05010/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA09359/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; MH56446/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; P50 DA005010/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; T32MH017140/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Narcotic Antagonists; 0/Receptors, Opioid; 36B82AMQ7N/Naloxone
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Redefining the p53 response element.
Next Document:  Legumes regulate Rhizobium bacteroid development and persistence by the supply of branched-chain ami...