Document Detail


Disparities in access to physicians and medications for the treatment of substance use disorders between publicly and privately funded treatment programs in the United States.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23384373     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Prior research suggests that publicly funded substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs lag behind privately funded programs in adoption of evidence-based practices, resulting in disparities in access to high-quality SUD treatment. These disparities highlight a critical public health concern because the majority of SUD patients in the United States are treated in the publicly funded treatment sector. This study uses recent data to examine disparities in access to physicians and availability of medications for the treatment of SUDs between publicly and privately funded SUD treatment programs.
METHOD: Data were collected from 595 specialty SUD treatment programs from 2007 to 2010 via face-to-face interviews, mailed surveys, and telephone interviews with treatment program administrators.
RESULTS: Publicly funded programs were less likely than privately funded programs to have a physician on staff, even after controlling for several organizational characteristics that were associated with access to physicians. The results of negative binomial regression indicated that, even after taking into account physician access and other organizational variables, publicly funded programs prescribed fewer SUD medications than privately funded SUD treatment programs.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients seeking treatment in publicly funded treatment programs continue to face disparities in access to high-quality SUD treatment that supports patients' choices among a range of medication options. However, implementation of the Affordable Care Act may facilitate greater access to physicians and use of medications in publicly funded SUD treatment programs.
Authors:
Amanda J Abraham; Hannah K Knudsen; Traci Rieckmann; Paul M Roman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs     Volume:  74     ISSN:  1938-4114     ISO Abbreviation:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-06     Completed Date:  2013-07-22     Revised Date:  2014-03-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101295847     Medline TA:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  258-65     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Evidence-Based Practice / economics
Financing, Government / economics
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility / economics*
Healthcare Disparities / economics*
Humans
Physicians / economics,  supply & distribution
Private Sector / economics
Regression Analysis
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers / economics,  organization & administration*,  standards
Substance-Related Disorders / economics,  rehabilitation*
United States
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 AA015974/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; R01 DA013110/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA014482/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01AA015974/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; R01DA013110/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01DA14482/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R37 DA013110/DA/NIDA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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