Document Detail


Differential associations of fast food and restaurant food consumption with 3-y change in body mass index: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17209197     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Away-from-home food consumption has rapidly increased, though little is known about the independent associations of restaurant food and fast food intake with body mass index (BMI) and BMI change. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to compare the associations of restaurant food and fast food consumption with current and 3-y changes in BMI. DESIGN: Multivariate linear regression models, with control for demographic and lifestyle factors, were used to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating with BMI by using data from subjects of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (n = 3394) obtained at exam years 7 (1992-1993) and 10 (1995-1996). RESULTS: Forty percent of the sample increased their weekly consumption of restaurant or fast food, though mean (+/-SD) changes were -0.16 +/- 2.39 times/wk (P = 0.0001) and -0.56 +/- 3.04 times/wk (P < 0.0001), respectively. Cross-sectionally, fast food, but not restaurant food, consumption was positively associated with BMI. Similarly, higher consumption of fast food at year 7 was associated with a 0.16-unit higher BMI at year 10. After adjustment for baseline away-from-home eating, increased consumption of fast food only (beta: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.39) and of both restaurant food and fast food (beta: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.51) were positively associated with BMI change, though the estimates were not significantly different (P = 0.47). Increased consumption of restaurant food only was unrelated to BMI change (beta: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.21, 0.19), which differed significantly (P = 0.014) from the estimate for an increase in both restaurant food and fast food intake. CONCLUSIONS: We found differential effects of restaurant food and fast food intakes on BMI, although the observed differences were not always statistically significant. More research is needed to determine whether the differential effects are related to consumer characteristics or the food itself.
Authors:
Kiyah J Duffey; Penny Gordon-Larsen; David R Jacobs; O Dale Williams; Barry M Popkin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  85     ISSN:  0002-9165     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2007 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-01-08     Completed Date:  2007-02-15     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  201-8     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Body Mass Index*
Coronary Artery Disease / epidemiology*,  etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy Intake / physiology*
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Obesity / epidemiology*,  etiology
Overweight
Restaurants*
Risk Factors
Weight Gain / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK56350/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K01-HD044263/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; N01-HC-48047/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48048/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48049/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48050/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-95095/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; P30-ES10126/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01-AA12162/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; R01-CA109831/CA/NCI NIH HHS; R01-CA121152/CA/NCI NIH HHS

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