Document Detail


Differences between experienced and novice Rugby Union players during small-sided games.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23265021     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this study was to compare physical exertion and game performance indicators of experienced and novice Rugby Union players when playing small-sided games. Forty male players (M age = 21.6 yr., SD = 3.6; M Height = 177.7cm, SD = 7.4; M body mass 81.2 kg, SD = 10.2) participated in eight 6 vs 6 small-sided games over a 4-wk. period, with 12 min. continuous duration in a 60 x 40 m playing area. All players wore GPS units and heart rate belts. No statistically significant differences in the physical exertion measures between experienced and novice players were found. However, the manual notational analysis revealed substantial differences between players in all game performance indicators, with better performance by the experienced players (Passes made ES = 0.5; Tackles made ES = 1.0; Tries ES = 0.5). These results suggest the possibility that specific physical conditioning might be achieved without also achieving technical and tactical excellence.
Authors:
Luís Vaz; Nuno Leite; P V João; Bruno Gonçalves; Jaime Sampaio
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Perceptual and motor skills     Volume:  115     ISSN:  0031-5125     ISO Abbreviation:  Percept Mot Skills     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-25     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401131     Medline TA:  Percept Mot Skills     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  594-604     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health and Human Development (CIDESD), Portugal. lvaz@utad.pt
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