Document Detail


Dietary intake and status of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a population of fish-eating and non-fish-eating meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans and the product-precursor ratio [corrected] of α-linolenic acid to long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: results from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20861171     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Intakes of n-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important for health. Because fish is the major source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), non-fish-eaters may have suboptimal n-3 PUFA status, although the importance of the conversion of plant-derived α-linolenic acid (ALA) to EPA and DHA is debated.
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine intakes, food sources, and status of n-3 PUFAs according to dietary habit (fish-eaters and non-fish-eating meat-eaters, vegetarians, or vegans) and estimated conversion between dietary ALA and circulating long-chain n-3 PUFAs.
DESIGN: This study included 14,422 men and women aged 39-78 y from the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition)-Norfolk cohort with 7-d diary data and a substudy in 4902 individuals with plasma phospholipid fatty acid measures. Intakes and status of n-3 PUFAs were measured, and the product-precursor ratio [corrected] of ALA to circulating n-3 PUFAs was calculated.
RESULTS: Most of the dietary intake of EPA and DHA was supplied by fish; however, meat was the major source in meat-eaters, and spreading fats, soups, and sauces were the major sources in vegetarians. Total n-3 PUFA intakes in non-fish-eaters were 57-80% of those in fish-eaters, but status differences were considerably smaller [corrected]. The estimated product-precursor ratio [corrected] was greater in women than in men and greater in non-fish-eaters than in fish-eaters.
CONCLUSIONS: Substantial differences in intakes and in sources of n-3 PUFAs existed between the dietary-habit groups, but the differences in status were smaller than expected, possibly because the product-precursor ratio [corrected] was greater in non-fish-eaters than in fish-eaters, potentially indicating increased estimated conversion of ALA. If intervention studies were to confirm these findings, it could have implications for fish requirements.
Authors:
Ailsa A Welch; Subodha Shakya-Shrestha; Marleen A H Lentjes; Nicholas J Wareham; Kay-Tee Khaw
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-09-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  92     ISSN:  1938-3207     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-21     Completed Date:  2010-11-09     Revised Date:  2014-02-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1040-51     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Diet*
Diet Records
Diet, Vegetarian*
Fatty Acids, Omega-3* / administration & dosage,  biosynthesis,  blood
Female
Fishes*
Humans
Male
Meat*
Middle Aged
Seafood*
Sex Factors
alpha-Linolenic Acid / metabolism*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
G0401527//Medical Research Council; MC_U106179471//Medical Research Council; //Cancer Research UK; //Medical Research Council
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Fatty Acids, Omega-3; 0RBV727H71/alpha-Linolenic Acid
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 May;93(5):1154-5; author reply 1155-6   [PMID:  21430120 ]
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):665-6; author reply 666-7   [PMID:  21191139 ]
Erratum In:
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):676

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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