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Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins from infancy until adulthood: A comparison between breast-feeding, toddler, and long-term exposure.
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MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9872716     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Food is the major source for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and dioxin accumulation in the human body. Therefore, investigating food habits from early ages until reproductive age (25 years) is important in order to assess exposure risk for the next generation. The objective of this study was to assess the PCB/dioxin exposure and the relative contribution of different foods to total exposure during preschool age. Particularly, the importance of lactational PCB/dioxin exposure vs. dietary exposure until adulthood was investigated. A cohort of 207 children was studied from birth until preschool age. Based on 3 planar PCBs and 17 2,3,7,8-substituted dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) measured in breast milk, a model was developed to calculate the cumulative toxic equivalent (TEQ) intake during breast-feeding (0-1 year). In 3. 5-year-old children, daily dietary intake of planar PCB-TEQ and dioxin-TEQ was measured with a validated food questionnaire. Cumulative TEQ intake from 1 to 5 years was estimated using the PCB- and dioxin-TEQ intake measured with the food questionnaire. Cumulative TEQ intake from 6 to 25 years was estimated using national food consumption and contamination data of PCB- and dioxin-TEQ intake. In toddlers, dairy products contributed 43% to PCB-TEQ and 50% to dioxin-TEQ intake. Meat and meat products contributed 14% and 19%, respectively, and processed foods 23% and 15%, respectively. Breast-feeding for 6 months contributed to the cumulative PCB/dioxin TEQ intake until 25 years of age, 12% in boys and 14% in girls. The daily TEQ intake per kilogram body weight is 50 times higher in breast-fed infants and three times higher in toddlers than in adults. Long-term dietary exposure to PCBs and dioxins in men and women is partly due to breast-feeding (12 and 14%, respectively). After weaning, dairy products, processed foods, and meat are major contributors of PCB and dioxin accumulation until reproductive age. Instead of discouraging breast-feeding, maternal transfer of PCBs and dioxins to the next generation must be avoided by enforcement of strict regulations for PCB and dioxin discharge and by reducing consumption of animal products and processed foods in all ages.
Authors:
S Patandin; P C Dagnelie; P G Mulder; E Op de Coul; J E van der Veen; N Weisglas-Kuperus; P J Sauer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Environmental health perspectives     Volume:  107     ISSN:  0091-6765     ISO Abbreviation:  Environ. Health Perspect.     Publication Date:  1999 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1999-03-04     Completed Date:  1999-03-04     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0330411     Medline TA:  Environ Health Perspect     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  45-51     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus University and University Hospital/Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Child, Preschool
Diet*
Dioxins / analysis*
Female
Food Contamination / analysis*
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lactation*
Male
Netherlands
Polychlorinated Biphenyls / analysis*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dioxins; 0/Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Oct;107(10):A495-7   [PMID:  10504160 ]
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jan;107(1):1   [PMID:  10068291 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Full Text
Journal Information
Journal ID (nlm-ta): Environ Health Perspect
ISSN: 0091-6765
Article Information
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Print publication date: Month: 1 Year: 1999
Volume: 107 Issue: 1
First Page: 45 Last Page: 51
ID: 1566290
PubMed Id: 9872716

Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins from infancy until adulthood: A comparison between breast-feeding, toddler, and long-term exposure.
S Patandin
P C Dagnelie
P G Mulder
E Op de Coul
J E van der Veen
N Weisglas-Kuperus
P J Sauer
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus University and University Hospital/Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.



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