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Dietary correlates of temporomandibular joint morphology in the great apes.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23225317     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Behavioral observations of great apes have consistently identified differences in feeding behavior among species, and these differences have been linked to variation in masticatory form. As the point at which the mandible and cranium articulate, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an important component of the masticatory apparatus. Forces are transmitted between the mandible and cranium via the TMJ, and this joint helps govern mandibular range of motion. This study examined the extent to which TMJ form covaries with feeding behavior in the great apes by testing a series of biomechanical hypotheses relating to specific components of joint shape using linear measurements extracted from three-dimensional coordinate data. Results of these analyses found that taxa differ significantly in TMJ shape, particularly in the mandibular fossa. Chimpanzees have relatively more anteroposteriorly elongated joint surfaces, whereas gorillas tend to have relatively anteroposteriorly compressed joints. Orangutans were most commonly intermediate in form between Pan and Gorilla, perhaps reflecting a trade-off between jaw gape and load resistance capabilities. Importantly, much of the observed variation among taxa reflects differences in morphologies that facilitate gape over force production. These data therefore continue to emphasize the unclear relationship between mandibular loading and bony morphology, but highlight the need for further data regarding food material properties, jaw gape, and ingestive/food processing behaviors. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Authors:
Claire E Terhune
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-12-7
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of physical anthropology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1096-8644     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Phys. Anthropol.     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0400654     Medline TA:  Am J Phys Anthropol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Affiliation:
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Box 104780, Durham, NC. claire.terhune@duke.edu.
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