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Dietary adaptations of temperate primates: comparisons of Japanese and Barbary macaques.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21340696     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Habitat, diet and leaf chemistry are compared between Japanese and Barbary macaques to reveal the similarities and differences in dietary adaptations of temperate primates living at the eastern and western extremes of the genus Macaca. Tree species diversity and proportion of fleshy-fruited species are much higher in Japan than in North Africa. Both species spend considerable annual feeding time on leaves. Japanese macaques prefer fruits and seeds over leaves, and Barbary macaques prefer seeds. These characteristics are adaptive in temperate regions where fruit availability varies considerably with season, since animals can survive during the lean period by relying on leaf and other vegetative foods. The two species are different with respect to the higher consumption of herbs by Barbary macaques, and the leaves consumed contain high condensed and hydrolysable tannin for Barbary but not for Japanese macaques. Barbary macaques supplement less diverse tree foods with herbs. Because of the low species diversity and high tannin content of the dominant tree species, Barbary macaques may have developed the capacity to cope with tannin. This supports the idea that digestion of leaves is indispensable to survive in temperate regions where fruit and seed foods are not available for a prolonged period during each year.
Authors:
Goro Hanya; Nelly Ménard; Mohamed Qarro; Mohamed Ibn Tattou; Mieko Fuse; Dominique Vallet; Aya Yamada; Moe Go; Hino Takafumi; Riyou Tsujino; Naoki Agetsuma; Kazuo Wada
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-2-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  Primates; journal of primatology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1610-7365     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-2-22     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401152     Medline TA:  Primates     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Kanrin 41-2, Inuyama, Aichi, 484-8506, Japan, hanya@pri.kyoto-u.ac.jp.
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