Document Detail


Dialysis for thiocyanate intoxication: a case report and review of the literature.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16883131     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Limited data are available on the use of dialysis to treat cyanide or thiocyanate intoxication. This report describes the case of a 65-year-old woman with renal insufficiency who had development of thiocyanate toxicity secondary to a nitroprusside infusion. A rapid decline in her blood thiocyanate level was observed in response to initiation of continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration.
Authors:
Sharon J Nessim; Robert M A Richardson
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  ASAIO journal (American Society for Artificial Internal Organs : 1992)     Volume:  52     ISSN:  1058-2916     ISO Abbreviation:  ASAIO J.     Publication Date:    2006 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-08-02     Completed Date:  2006-09-29     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9204109     Medline TA:  ASAIO J     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  479-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Female
Hemodiafiltration / methods
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Nitroprusside / administration & dosage,  adverse effects*,  metabolism,  therapeutic use
Renal Dialysis*
Renal Insufficiency / complications,  etiology
Thiocyanates / blood*,  toxicity*
Treatment Outcome
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Thiocyanates; 15078-28-1/Nitroprusside; 302-04-5/thiocyanate

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Hemodynamic guidelines for design and control of a turbodynamic pediatric ventricular assist device.
Next Document:  Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.