Document Detail


Diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in assessing myocardial viability.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18690157     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Assessment of viability is pivotal to the prognosis of patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular dysfunction. Patients with viable myocardium have a better prognosis with revascularization; however, patients with nonviable myocardium have worse outcomes with higher perioperative morbidity and mortality subsequent to revascularization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging not only is the current reference standard technique in measuring cardiac chamber size and function and myocardial mass and volume but also provides spatially registered 2- or 3-dimensional data sets in myocardial perfusion and myocardial contrast enhancement in the same imaging session. Late gadolinium enhancement by CMR is the best current technique in discriminating myocardial scar versus viable myocardium. An extensive body of preclinical evidence has validated the detection and characterization of the morphology of infarcted tissue. In clinical studies, infarct characteristics by CMR has demonstrated a strong clinical utility in the prediction of left ventricular functional recovery and patient prognosis. In this paper, we aim to review the current CMR techniques in characterizing the spectrum of myocardial changes because of CAD, in the prediction of myocardial viability, and the current evidence of CMR's role in patient prognosis. In addition, we will also review the current literature comparing the clinical utility of CMR with other established imaging modalities in the assessment of CAD.
Authors:
Raymond Y Kwong; Hema Korlakunta
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Topics in magnetic resonance imaging : TMRI     Volume:  19     ISSN:  1536-1004     ISO Abbreviation:  Top Magn Reson Imaging     Publication Date:  2008 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-08-11     Completed Date:  2008-10-20     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8913523     Medline TA:  Top Magn Reson Imaging     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  15-24     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. rykwong@partners.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Cell Survival
Coronary Disease / diagnosis,  therapy
Female
Gadolinium DTPA / diagnostic use*
Humans
Image Enhancement / methods*
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine / methods*
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction / diagnosis*,  therapy
Myocardial Ischemia / diagnosis,  therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion / methods
Myocardium / pathology*
Positron-Emission Tomography / methods
Prognosis
Sensitivity and Specificity
Tissue Survival / physiology*
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon / methods
Ventricular Remodeling / physiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
80529-93-7/Gadolinium DTPA

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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