Document Detail


Developmental origins of obesity: programmed adipogenesis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23188593     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The metabolic syndrome epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among pregnant women, represents a significant public health problem. There is increasing recognition that the risk of adult obesity is clearly influenced by prenatal and infant environmental exposures, particularly nutrition. This tenet is the fundamental basis of developmental programming. Low birth weight, together with infant catch-up growth, is associated with a significant risk of adult obesity. Exposure to maternal obesity, with or without GDM, or having a high birth weight also represents an increased risk for childhood and adult obesity. Animal models have replicated human epidemiologic findings and elucidated potential programming mechanisms that include altered organ development, cellular signaling responses, and epigenetic modifications. Prenatal care has made great strides in optimizing maternal, fetal, and neonatal health, and now has the opportunity to begin interventions which prevent or reduce childhood/adult obesity. Guidelines that integrate optimal pregnancy nutrition and weight gain, management of GDM, and newborn feeding strategies with long-term consequences on adult obesity, remain to be elucidated.
Authors:
Mina Desai; Marie Beall; Michael G Ross
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current diabetes reports     Volume:  13     ISSN:  1539-0829     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr. Diab. Rep.     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-14     Completed Date:  2013-06-19     Revised Date:  2014-02-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101093791     Medline TA:  Curr Diab Rep     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  27-33     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adipogenesis*
Animals
Birth Weight
Growth and Development*
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Obesity / pathology*,  physiopathology
Risk Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 DK081756/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01DK081756/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01HD054751/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; UL1 TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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