Document Detail


Development of complex atherosclerotic lesions in pigs with inherited hyper-LDL cholesterolemia bearing mutant alleles for apolipoprotein B.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1853929     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The development of atherosclerotic lesions was studied in pigs aged 4 to 54 months with inherited hyperlow-density lipoprotein (LDL) and hypercholesterolemia (IHLC pigs). These pigs bear the Lpb5 and Lpu1 mutant alleles for apolipoproteins B and U and demonstrate spontaneously elevated cholesterol levels, due primarily to elevated LDL. By 1 year of age, IHLC pigs exhibited focal lesions in the major coronary, iliac, and femoral arteries that were composed of macrophage-derived from cells and smooth muscle cells. Peripheral arterial lesions were more fibrous than those found in the coronaries. By 2 years of age, complicated stenotic lesions containing fibrous caps, necrotic cores, cholesterol clefts, granular calcium deposits, and neovascularization deep within the lesion were common in the major coronary vessels. Peripheral vascular lesions were more smooth muscle cell-rich and fibrotic. By 3 years of age, neovascularization was observed throughout the intimal lesion, and hemorrhage and rupture were common. The extent of complicated lesion formation correlated with both the degree and duration of hypercholesterolemia, with the most stenotic lesions observed in the coronary arteries of the oldest animals having the highest cholesterol levels. Thus IHLC pigs with mutant apolipoproteins B and U develop complicated atherosclerotic plaques that closely resemble advanced atherosclerotic lesions found in humans.
Authors:
M F Prescott; C H McBride; J Hasler-Rapacz; J Von Linden; J Rapacz
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of pathology     Volume:  139     ISSN:  0002-9440     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Pathol.     Publication Date:  1991 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1991-08-19     Completed Date:  1991-08-19     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370502     Medline TA:  Am J Pathol     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  139-47     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Research Department, CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Summit, New Jersey 07901.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aging / physiology
Alleles*
Animals
Apolipoproteins B / genetics*
Arteries / pathology,  ultrastructure
Arteriosclerosis / pathology*
Cholesterol, LDL
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II / genetics*,  pathology
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Mutation*
Swine
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HL39774/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Apolipoproteins B; 0/Cholesterol, LDL
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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