Document Detail


Design and development of an Internet registry for congenital heart defects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11857509     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Congenital Heart Defects (CHD) are conditions that encompass more than 50 diagnoses and are due to developmental abnormalities early in fetal life. The King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia treats approximately 100 new cases per month. We recently developed a new CHD Registry that captures, stores and processes our data via the Internet. METHODS: The Registry was developed using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Microsoft Active Server Pages and Microsoft Structured Query Language (SQL). RESULTS: Details of CHD cases are captured in a World Wide Web (WWW) Registry, permitting any browser-enabled PC or Mac to participate fully in all registry functions, including data-entry, viewing, editing, searching, reporting, validating, charting, and exporting data subsets to statistics packages. It includes "administrative" features and an active security system. The paper forms have been designed to reflect the "look and feel" of the Web pages. Automatic validation procedures are also included. CONCLUSIONS: Our Registry has been in operation for 3 years. It serves 10 PCs and contains more than 3,000 registered cases of CHD. It is the first CHD Registry to be fully functional on the Internet. It is also the first dedicated CHD registry, and the first to routinely report on the full spectrum of CHD diagnoses. The WWW offers several logistical advantages to disease registries, especially those that represent large regions. It also offers the possibility of sharing resources between registries, facilitating the aggregation and analysis of disease data on a world-wide scale. This is useful for rare diseases such as CHD (see http://rc.kfshrc.edu.sa/chdr/demo/).
Authors:
Wajeeh Mitri; Amy L Sandridge; Shazia Subhani; William Greer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Teratology     Volume:  65     ISSN:  0040-3709     ISO Abbreviation:  Teratology     Publication Date:  2002 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-02-21     Completed Date:  2002-09-18     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0153257     Medline TA:  Teratology     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  78-87     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Affiliation:
Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer Security
Database Management Systems*
Databases, Factual*
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital*
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Internet*
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized*
Middle Aged
Registries*
Saudi Arabia

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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