Document Detail


Depressive symptoms in mothers of prematurely born infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17353730     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: This longitudinal, descriptive study described the level of depressive symptoms in mothers of preterm infants from birth through 27 months corrected age and examined factors associated with depressive symptoms. The framework for the study was guided by an ecological developmental systems perspective and an adaptation of the Preterm Parental Distress Model. METHODS: In this model, we hypothesize that a mother's emotional distress to the birth and parenting of a prematurely born child is influenced by personal and family factors, severity of the infant's health status, and illness-related stress and worry. Participants were 102 mothers of preterm infants who were off the ventilator and not otherwise dependent on major technology at enrollment. RESULTS: Mean depressive symptoms scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) during hospitalization were high and more than half the mothers (63%) had scores of > or =16 indicating risk of depression. Depressive scores declined over time until 6 months and then were fairly stable. Unmarried mothers, mothers of infants who were rehospitalized, and mothers who reported more maternal role alteration stress during hospitalization and worry about the child's health had more depressive symptoms through the first year. Mothers who reported more parental role alteration stress during hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 1.570, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.171-2.104) and more worry about the child's health (OR = 2.350, 95% CI: 1.842-2.998) were more likely to experience elevated CES-D scores that put them at risk of depression. Also, mothers of rehospitalized infants had decreasing odds of elevated CES-D scores over time (OR = 0.982 per week, 95% CI: 0.968-0.996). CONCLUSIONS: Findings have implications for the support of mothers during hospitalization and in the early years of parenting a preterm infant.
Authors:
Margaret Shandor Miles; Diane Holditch-Davis; Todd A Schwartz; Mark Scher
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP     Volume:  28     ISSN:  0196-206X     ISO Abbreviation:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Publication Date:  2007 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-03-13     Completed Date:  2007-04-18     Revised Date:  2007-12-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006933     Medline TA:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  36-44     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460, USA. mmiles@email.unc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Depression / epidemiology*,  psychology,  rehabilitation
Family / psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Maternal Age
Mothers / psychology*
Stress, Psychological / epidemiology,  psychology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
NR01894/NR/NINR NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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