Document Detail


Dense module enumeration in biological networks.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23192536     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Automatic discovery of functional complexes from protein interaction data is a rewarding but challenging problem. While previous approaches use approximations to extract dense modules, our approach exactly solves the problem of dense module enumeration. Furthermore, constraints from additional information sources such as gene expression and phenotype data can be integrated, so we can systematically detect dense modules with interesting profiles. Given a weighted protein interaction network, our method discovers all protein sets that satisfy a user-defined minimum density threshold. We employ a reverse search strategy, which allows us to exploit the density criterion in an efficient way.
Authors:
Koji Tsuda; Elisabeth Georgii
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)     Volume:  939     ISSN:  1940-6029     ISO Abbreviation:  Methods Mol. Biol.     Publication Date:  2013  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9214969     Medline TA:  Methods Mol Biol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
AIST Computational Biology Research Center, Tokyo, Japan, koji.tsuda@aist.go.jp.
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