Document Detail


Delirium: A disturbance of circadian integrity?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23916192     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Delirium is a serious neuropsychiatric syndrome of acute onset that occurs in approximately one in five general hospital patients and is associated with serious adverse outcomes that include loss of adaptive function, persistent cognitive problems and increased mortality. Recent studies indicate a three-domain model for delirium that includes generalised cognitive impairment, disturbed executive cognition, and disruption of behaviours that are under circadian control such as sleep-wake cycle and motor activity levels. As a consequence, attention has focused upon the possible role of the circadian timing system (CTS) in the pathophysiology of delirium. We explored this possibility by reviewing evidence that (1) many symptoms that occur in delirium are influenced by circadian rhythms, (2) many features of recognised circadian rhythm disorders are similar to characteristic features of delirium, (3) common risk factors for delirium are known to disrupt circadian systems, (4) physiological disturbances of circadian systems have been noted in delirious patients, and (5) positive effects in the treatment of delirium have been demonstrated for melatonin and related agents that influence the circadian timing system. A programme of future studies that can help to clarify the relevance of circadian integrity to delirium is described. Such work can provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of delirium while also identifying opportunities for more targeted therapeutic efforts.
Authors:
James M Fitzgerald; Dimitrios Adamis; Paula T Trzepacz; Niamh O'Regan; Suzanne Timmons; Colum Dunne; David J Meagher
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-7-31
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medical hypotheses     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1532-2777     ISO Abbreviation:  Med. Hypotheses     Publication Date:  2013 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-8-6     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505668     Medline TA:  Med Hypotheses     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Graduate Entry Medical School, University of Limerick, Ireland; Cognitive Impairment Research Group, Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (4i), Graduate Entry Medical School, University of Limerick, Ireland.
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