Document Detail


Decreased spontaneous attention to social scenes in 6-month-old infants later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23313640     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The ability to spontaneously attend to the social overtures and activities of others is essential for the development of social cognition and communication. This ability is critically impaired in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD); however, it is not clear if prodromal symptoms in this area are already present in the first year of life of those affected by the disorder.
METHODS: To examine whether 6-month-old infants later diagnosed with ASD exhibit atypical spontaneous social monitoring skills, visual responses of 67 infants at high-risk and 50 at low-risk for ASD were studied using an eye-tracking task. Based on their clinical presentation in the third year, infants were divided into those with ASD, those exhibiting atypical development, and those developing typically.
RESULTS: Compared with the control groups, 6-month-old infants later diagnosed with ASD attended less to the social scene, and when they did look at the scene, they spent less time monitoring the actress in general and her face in particular. Limited attention to the actress and her activities was not accompanied by enhanced attention to objects.
CONCLUSIONS: Prodromal symptoms of ASD at 6 months include a diminished ability to attend spontaneously to people and their activities. A limited attentional bias toward people early in development is likely to have a detrimental impact on the specialization of social brain networks and the emergence of social interaction patterns. Further investigation into its underlying mechanisms and role in psychopathology of ASD in the first year is warranted.
Authors:
Katarzyna Chawarska; Suzanne Macari; Frederick Shic
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2013-01-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  Biological psychiatry     Volume:  74     ISSN:  1873-2402     ISO Abbreviation:  Biol. Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2013 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-07-12     Completed Date:  2013-10-30     Revised Date:  2014-07-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0213264     Medline TA:  Biol Psychiatry     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  195-203     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / physiopathology*
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive / diagnosis*,  physiopathology*
Developmental Disabilities / diagnosis,  physiopathology*
Disease Progression
Face
Female
Fixation, Ocular
Humans
Infant
Male
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Photic Stimulation
Social Behavior*
Social Perception
Time Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1R03MH086732/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; P01 HD003008/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P01 HD003008/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 MH087554/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH087554/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R03 MH092618/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R03 MH092618-01A1/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Aug 1;74(3):162-3   [PMID:  23845582 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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