Document Detail


Dairy Foods: Are They Politically Correct?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12813186     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This article considers the scientific evidence on the prevalence and management of verified lactose intolerance and the growing misperception that dairy foods should be avoided because ethnic populations cannot tolerate them. Healthcare professionals, in particular, must understand why eliminating dairy foods is rarely necessary and is generally undesirable. The genetically programmed ability to digest the milk sugar lactose normally declines throughout childhood in all ethnic groups. Only rarely does lactase nonpersistence result in verifiable lactose intolerance. The intolerance-gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal cramping-is easily managed when it occurs and is not a barrier to the consumption of 2 to 3 servings of calcium-rich dairy foods, as encouraged by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Authors:
Barbara J. Moore
Related Documents :
12055586 - Lactose malabsorption and intolerance and peak bone mass.
3553256 - Milk intolerance and microbe-containing dairy foods.
17953786 - Effects of retro-nasal aroma release on satiation.
12839776 - Temporal stability and biodiversity of two complex antilisterial cheese-ripening microb...
19879496 - Frequency and types of foods advertised on saturday morning and weekday afternoon engli...
21535766 - Documentation of fatty acid profiles in lamb meat and lamb-based infant foods.
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nutrition today     Volume:  38     ISSN:  0029-666X     ISO Abbreviation:  Nutr Today     Publication Date:    2003 May-Jun
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-Jun-18     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0055201     Medline TA:  Nutr Today     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  82-90     Citation Subset:  -    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Can Chinese Children Drink Milk?
Next Document:  Fast-Casual Dining: Our Next Eating Passion?