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Current management of antenatal hydronephrosis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22836304     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The strategy for the management of children with urinary tract anomalies has changed considerably as a result of the development of ultrasound equipment and techniques that allow for detailed fetal evaluation. Hydronephrosis is the most common urogenital anomaly detected, suggesting that an obstructive process may be potentially present. The goal of postnatal management is to identify and treat those patients whose renal function is at risk, while leaving alone the high percentage of patients who are at no risk of renal damage. This management involves a spectrum of radiological, medical, and surgical interventions for diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment. In this article, we review our current understanding of the natural history of antenatal hydronephrosis and its management.
Authors:
Kleiton G R Yamaçake; Hiep T Nguyen
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-7-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1432-198X     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-7-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8708728     Medline TA:  Pediatr Nephrol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Urology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Hunnewell-353, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
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