Document Detail


A culture conducive to women's academic success: development of a measure.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23018337     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: The work environment culture inhibits women's career success in academic medicine. The lack of clarity and consistency in the definition, measurement, and analysis of culture constrains current research on the topic. The authors addressed this gap by defining the construct of a culture conducive to women's academic success (CCWAS) and creating a measure (i.e., tool) to evaluate it.
METHOD: First, the authors conducted a review of published literature, held focus groups, and consulted with subject matter experts to develop a measure of academic workplace culture for women. Then they developed and pilot-tested the measure with a convenience sample of women assistant professors. After refining the measure, they administered it, along with additional scales for validation, to 133 women assistant professors at the University of Pennsylvania. Finally, they conducted statistical analyses to explore the measure's nature and validity.
RESULTS: A CCWAS consists of four distinct, but related, dimensions: equal access, work-life balance, freedom from gender biases, and supportive leadership. The authors found evidence that women within departments/divisions agree on the supportiveness of their units but that substantial differences among units exist. The analyses provided strong evidence for the reliability and validity of their measure.
CONCLUSIONS: This report contributes to a growing understanding of women's academic medicine careers and provides a measure that researchers can use to assess the supportiveness of the culture for women assistant professors and that leaders can use to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase the supportiveness of the environment for women faculty.
Authors:
Alyssa Friede Westring; Rebecca M Speck; Mary Dupuis Sammel; Patricia Scott; Lucy Wolf Tuton; Jeane Ann Grisso; Stephanie Abbuhl
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review; Validation Studies    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges     Volume:  87     ISSN:  1938-808X     ISO Abbreviation:  Acad Med     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-31     Completed Date:  2013-01-02     Revised Date:  2013-11-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8904605     Medline TA:  Acad Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1622-31     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Management, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois 60605, USA. awestrin@depaul.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Achievement*
Adult
Career Mobility*
Culture
Faculty, Medical*
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction*
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Pennsylvania
Physicians, Women*
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires*
Schools, Medical*
Sexism
Social Environment
Social Support
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 NS069793/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01-NS069793-03/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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