Document Detail


Cultural aspects of African American eating patterns.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9395569     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The high mortality from diet-related diseases among African Americans strongly suggests a need to adopt diets lower in total fat, saturated fat and salt and higher in fiber. However, such changes would be contrary to some traditional African American cultural practices. Focus group interviews were used to explore cultural aspects of eating patterns among low- and middle-income African Americans recruited from an urban community in Pennsylvania. In total, 21 males and 32 females, aged 13-65+ years were recruited using a networking technique. Participants identified eating practices commonly attributed to African Americans and felt that these were largely independent of socioeconomic status. They were uncertain about links between African American eating patterns and African origins but clear about influences of slavery and economic disadvantage. The perception that African American food patterns were characteristically adaptive to external conditions, suggest that, for effective dietary change in African American communities, changes in the food availability will need to precede or take place in parallel with changes recommended to individuals. Cultural attitudes about where and with whom food is eaten emerged as being equivalent in importance to attitudes about specific foods. These findings emphasize the importance of continued efforts to identify ways to increase the relevance of cultural context and meanings in dietary counseling so that health and nutrition interventions are anchored in values as perceived, in this case, by African Americans.
Authors:
C O Airhihenbuwa; S Kumanyika; T D Agurs; A Lowe; D Saunders; C B Morssink
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Ethnicity & health     Volume:  1     ISSN:  1355-7858     ISO Abbreviation:  Ethn Health     Publication Date:  1996 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-12-31     Completed Date:  1997-12-31     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9608374     Medline TA:  Ethn Health     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  245-60     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Health Education Department, College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans / education,  psychology*
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats*
Dietary Fiber*
Female
Focus Groups
Food Habits / ethnology*
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pennsylvania
Poverty
Questionnaires
Sodium Chloride, Dietary*
Urban Health
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HL46778/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Fats; 0/Sodium Chloride, Dietary

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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