Document Detail


'Cos girls aren't supposed to eat like pigs are they?': Young women negotiating gendered discursive constructions of food and eating.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21610010     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
While psycho-medical understandings of 'eating disorders' draw distinctions between those who 'have'/'do not have' eating disorders, feminist poststructuralist researchers argue that these detract from political/socio-cultural conditions that invoke problematic eating and embodied subjectivities. Using poststructuralist discourse analysis, we examine young women's talk around food and eating, in particular, the negotiation of tensions arising from derogating aspects of hetero-normative femininities, while accounting for own 'feminine' practices (e.g. 'dieting') and subjectivities. Analysis suggested that eating/dieting was accounted for by drawing upon neo-liberalist discourses around individual choice; however, these may obscure gendered, classed and racialized power relations operating in local and wider contexts.
Authors:
Maxine Woolhouse; Katy Day; Bridgette Rickett; Kate Milnes
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-5-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of health psychology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1461-7277     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-5-25     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9703616     Medline TA:  J Health Psychol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Leeds Metropolitan University, UK.
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