Document Detail


Corticosterone mediates stress-related increased intestinal permeability in a region-specific manner.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23336591     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Chronic psychological stress (CPS) is associated with increased intestinal epithelial permeability and visceral hyperalgesia. It is unknown whether corticosterone (CORT) plays a role in mediating alterations of epithelial permeability in response to CPS.
METHODS: Male rats were subjected to 1-h water avoidance (WA) stress or subcutaneous CORT injection daily for 10 consecutive days in the presence or absence of corticoid receptor antagonist RU-486. The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) was measured. The in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion was used to measure intestinal permeability in jejunum and colon simultaneously.
KEY RESULTS: We observed significant decreases in the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and tight junction proteins in the colon, but not the jejunum in stressed rats. These changes were largely reproduced by serial CORT injections in control rats and were significantly reversed by RU-486. Stressed and CORT-injected rats demonstrated a threefold increase in permeability for PEG-400 (MW) in colon, but not jejunum and significant increase in VMR to CRD, which was significantly reversed by RU-486. In addition, no differences in permeability to PEG-4000 and PEG-35 000 were detected between control and WA groups.
CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: Our findings indicate that CPS was associated with region-specific decrease in epithelial tight junction protein levels in the colon, increased colon epithelial permeability to low molecular weight macromolecules which were largely reproduced by CORT treatment in control rats and prevented by RU-486. These observations implicate a novel, region-specific role for CORT as a mediator of CPS-induced increased permeability to macromolecules across the colon epithelium.
Authors:
G Zheng; S-P Wu; Y Hu; D E Smith; J W Wiley; S Hong
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society     Volume:  25     ISSN:  1365-2982     ISO Abbreviation:  Neurogastroenterol. Motil.     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-22     Completed Date:  2013-09-10     Revised Date:  2014-02-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9432572     Medline TA:  Neurogastroenterol Motil     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e127-39     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Blotting, Western
Colon / drug effects,  metabolism*
Corticosterone / metabolism*,  pharmacology
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Hyperalgesia / metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects,  metabolism*
Male
Permeability
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Stress, Psychological / metabolism*
Tight Junctions / drug effects,  metabolism
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5 P50 DK34933/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 DK034933/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK052387/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK056997/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 GM035498/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS; R01DK052387/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01DK056997/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
W980KJ009P/Corticosterone
Comments/Corrections

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