Document Detail


Correlation between blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium intervention in a Chinese population.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19763120     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Blood pressure (BP) responses to dietary sodium and potassium intake vary among individuals. We examined the correlation between BP responses to dietary low-sodium, high-sodium, and potassium supplementation interventions in a feeding study.
METHODS: A total of 1,906 Chinese aged > or = 16 years participated in the dietary intervention that included a 7-day low-salt intervention (51.3 mmol/day), a 7-day high-salt intervention (307.8 mmol/day), and a 7-day high-salt plus potassium supplementation (60 mmol/day) intervention. BP was measured nine times during the 3-day baseline observation and during the last 3 days of each intervention phase using a random-zero sphygmomanometer.
RESULTS: The correlation coefficients (95% confidence intervals (CIs)) of the BP responses to low-sodium and high-sodium interventions were -0.47 (-0.51 to -0.44), -0.47 (-0.50 to -0.43), and -0.45 (-0.49 to -0.42) for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP), respectively (all P < 0.0001). The correlation coefficients (95% CI) of the BP responses to high-sodium intervention and potassium supplementation were -0.52 (-0.56 to -0.49), -0.48 (-0.52 to 0.45), and -0.52 (-0.55 to -0.48) for SBP, DBP, and MAP, respectively (all P < 0.0001). The kappa coefficients were moderate, varying from 0.28 to 0.34, between BP responses to low-sodium and high-sodium interventions (all P < 0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate there is a moderate correlation between BP responses to low-sodium and to high-sodium interventions, and BP responses to high-sodium intervention and potassium supplementation. Furthermore, our study suggests that individuals who were more sensitive to high-sodium diet might benefit more from a low-sodium and/or high-potassium intervention aimed at lowering BP levels.
Authors:
Qi Zhao; Dongfeng Gu; Jing Chen; Lydia A Bazzano; Dabeeru C Rao; James E Hixson; Cashell E Jaquish; Jie Cao; Jichun Chen; Jianxin Li; Treva Rice; Jiang He
Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-09-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of hypertension     Volume:  22     ISSN:  1941-7225     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Hypertens.     Publication Date:  2009 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-11-20     Completed Date:  2010-01-25     Revised Date:  2011-06-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8803676     Medline TA:  Am J Hypertens     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1281-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Asian Continental Ancestry Group / genetics
Blood Pressure / drug effects*
China
Humans
Potassium, Dietary / administration & dosage,  pharmacology*
Sodium, Dietary / administration & dosage,  pharmacology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K08HL091108/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL087263-04/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL090682-03/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL087263/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL090682/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; U01 HL072507-06/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; U01HL072507/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Potassium, Dietary; 0/Sodium, Dietary
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