Document Detail


Controlled family study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence of shared liability and transmission of partial syndromes.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10698815     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Lifetime rates of full and partial anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were determined in first-degree relatives of diagnostically pure proband groups and relatives of matched, never-ill comparison subjects. METHOD: Rates of each eating disorder were obtained for 1,831 relatives of 504 probands on the basis of personal structured clinical interviews and family history. Best-estimate diagnoses based on all available information were rendered without knowledge of proband status and pedigree identity. Only definite and probable diagnoses were considered. RESULTS: Whereas anorexia nervosa was rare in families of the comparison subjects, full and partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa aggregated in female relatives of both anorexic and bulimic probands. For the full syndrome of anorexia nervosa, the relative risks were 11.3 and 12.3 in female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. Bulimia nervosa was more common than anorexia nervosa in female relatives of comparison subjects, but it, too, aggregated in the families of ill probands; the corresponding relative risks for bulimia nervosa were 4.2 and 4.4 for female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. When partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were considered, relative risks fell by one-half in each group of ill probands. CONCLUSIONS: Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are familial. Their cross-transmission in families suggests a common, or shared, familial diathesis. The additional observation that familial aggregation and cross-transmission extend to milder phenotypes suggests the validity of their inclusion in a continuum of familial liability.
Authors:
M Strober; R Freeman; C Lampert; J Diamond; W Kaye
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of psychiatry     Volume:  157     ISSN:  0002-953X     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2000 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-03-14     Completed Date:  2000-03-14     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370512     Medline TA:  Am J Psychiatry     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  393-401     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, University of California, Los Angeles 90024-1759, USA. mstrober@mednet.ucla.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa / epidemiology*,  genetics
Bulimia / epidemiology*,  genetics
California / epidemiology
Family*
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales / statistics & numerical data
Risk Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AA08983/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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