Document Detail


Conservative treatment of splenic infarction and intestinal obstruction caused by a wandering spleen.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24700108     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The underdevelopment or absence of the splenic suspensary ligaments can lead to an uncommon condition termed the wandering spleen. It is usually asymptomatic but can present with an acute abdomen when associated with torsion. Most authors advocate surgical treatment. Herein, we report a case of torsion with infarction of the spleen and intestinal obstruction in a 36-year-old female patient which was successfully managed conservatively.
Authors:
U Ihedioha; A Syed; G Lloyd; A Scott
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-4-3
Journal Detail:
Title:  Scottish medical journal     Volume:  -     ISSN:  0036-9330     ISO Abbreviation:  Scott Med J     Publication Date:  2014 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-4-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2983335R     Medline TA:  Scott Med J     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
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