Document Detail


Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis : a review of the literature.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17007541     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (CARP) was first described >60 years ago. It is distinct from acanthosis nigricans. This article presents the results of a review of the literature in MEDLINE through May 2006 using the terms 'confluent and reticulated papillomatosis', 'reticulated and confluent papillomatosis of Gougerot and Carteaud', and 'reticulated papillomatosis'. A recent report has linked the presence of Dietzia spp. (family: Dietziaceae; suborder: Corynebacterineae; order: Actinomycetales) in the skin to CARP. CARP has also been linked to defects in keratinization. Other possible causes of CARP that have been suggested but seem less likely include endocrine abnormalities, Pityrosporum, a reaction to UV light, and a variation of cutaneous amyloidosis. CARP has been reported worldwide and occurs in both sexes, all age groups, and all races. The disorder can initially manifest as hyperkeratotic or verrucous papules that coalesce to form a reticular pattern peripherally and confluent plaques centrally. Although a variety of treatments for CARP exist, oral minocycline 50-100mg twice daily has been the preferred treatment. However, recent reports of the effectiveness of azithromycin 250-500mg three times weekly may make azithromycin the preferred treatment for CARP, since it has a more benign adverse effect profile than minocycline. Other effective antibacterial treatments include fusidic acid 1000mg daily, clarithromycin 500mg daily, erythromycin 1000mg daily, tetracycline 500mg twice daily, and cefdinir 300mg twice daily. If a recent finding that CARP is caused by a bacterial microorganism is replicated, treatment should likely be determined by bacterial sensitivities, antibacterial adverse effect profiles, and cost considerations. Other oral treatments of CARP that are effective but currently disfavored because of the effectiveness of minocycline include isotretinoin, acitretin, and etretinate. There have been mixed reports regarding the effectiveness of topical treatments, which include selenium sulfide, ketoconazole cream, tretinoin, tazarotene, tacalcitol, and calcipotriene (calcipotriol).
Authors:
Noah Scheinfeld
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of clinical dermatology     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1175-0561     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Clin Dermatol     Publication Date:  2006  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-09-29     Completed Date:  2007-01-18     Revised Date:  2009-11-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100895290     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Dermatol     Country:  New Zealand    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  305-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, New York, New York 10025, USA. Scheinfeld@earthlink.net
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acanthosis Nigricans / diagnosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use*
Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Male
Minocycline / therapeutic use*
Papilloma* / diagnosis,  drug therapy
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0/Antifungal Agents; 10118-90-8/Minocycline

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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