Document Detail


The concentration of out-of-pocket expenditures on complementary and alternative medicine in the United States.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22894889     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
CONTEXT: The most intense spenders on health services are considerably less healthy.49% report fair or poor health status compared to 15% of the general adult population and are elderly. Such findings have important implications for addressing national health-care spending because interventions targeting those people who are in poor health could theoretically generate dramatic cost savings. Although the popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States is well recognized, little is known about the distribution of out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM services.
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the distribution of out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM health services in the United States.
DESIGN: The research team used data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey to examine the distribution in the United States of out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM services and the characteristics of adult (age ≥ 18 years) CAM users (n = 2972) according to spending.
OUTCOME MEASURES: Using complex survey-design methods, the research team generated national estimates of expenditures on CAM services and used linear regression adjusted for covariates to determine whether self-reported health status predicted CAM spending.
RESULTS: According to our estimates, in 2007, over 30 million adults reported out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM services, and of these individuals, 7.2 million were heavy CAM spenders with a mean annual expenditure of $1385. The highest quartile of CAM spenders accounted for $10 billion of the $13.9 billion spent nationally on CAM in 2007. Self-reported health status did not differ among groups with differing levels of CAM spending, β = 1.00 (95% CI, 0.8-1.2).
CONCLUSIONS: Out-of-pocket spending on CAM is concentrated. Just a quarter of CAM users account for over 70% of all expenditures on CAM services, and health status does not appear to be associated with level of CAM spending.
Authors:
Matthew A Davis; William B Weeks
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Alternative therapies in health and medicine     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1078-6791     ISO Abbreviation:  Altern Ther Health Med     Publication Date:    2012 Sep-Oct
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-16     Completed Date:  2012-09-28     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9502013     Medline TA:  Altern Ther Health Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  36-42     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy, Lebanon, NH, USA. matthew.a.davis@darmouth.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Complementary Therapies / economics*,  utilization
Female
Financing, Personal / statistics & numerical data*
Health Behavior*
Health Expenditures / statistics & numerical data*
Health Status*
Humans
Income / statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Self Medication / economics*,  statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
United States / epidemiology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1K01AT006162/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; K01 AT006162/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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