Document Detail


Complementary feeding for infants 6 to 12 months.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20397553     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Complementary feeding, also known as weaning, mixed feeding or introduction of solid foods, should begin for infants by six months of age (26 weeks) but not before 17 weeks. Breast milk or infant formula should continue during the complementary feeding period with amounts gradually reduced as the variety of foods increases. As all infants' needs are different, health care professionals have to be aware of key nutrients and foods needed at the same time as monitoring growth and understanding the needs of parents and the resources available to them.
Authors:
Cowbrough Kathy
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The journal of family health care     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1474-9114     ISO Abbreviation:  J Fam Health Care     Publication Date:  2010  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-04-19     Completed Date:  2010-04-30     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101142028     Medline TA:  J Fam Health Care     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  20-3     Citation Subset:  N    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Child Development
Child Nutrition Sciences / education
Great Britain
Humans
Infant
Infant Food* / adverse effects,  supply & distribution
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Menu Planning
Nutrition Policy*
Nutritional Requirements
Parents / education,  psychology
Weaning

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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