Document Detail


Comparisons of energy intake and energy expenditure in overweight and obese women with and without binge eating disorder.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22016098     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in energy intake or energy expenditure that distinguish overweight/obese women with and without binge eating disorder (BED). Seventeen overweight/obese women with BED and 17 overweight/obese controls completed random 24-h dietary recall interviews, and had total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) assessed by the doubly labeled water (DLW) technique with concurrent food log data collection. Participants received two baseline dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans and had basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermic effect of food (TEF) measured using indirect calorimetry. Results indicated no between group differences in TDEE, BMR, and TEF. As in our previous work, according to dietary recall data, the BED group had significantly higher caloric intake on days when they had binge eating episodes than on days when they did not (3,255 vs. 2,343 kcal). There was no difference between BED nonbinge day intake and control group intake (2,233 vs. 2,140 kcal). Similar results were found for food log data. Dietary recall data indicated a trend toward higher average daily intake in the BED group (2,587 vs. 2,140 kcal). Furthermore, when comparing TDEE to dietary recall and food log data, both groups displayed significant under-reporting of caloric intake of similar magnitudes ranging from 20 to 33%. Predicted energy requirements estimated via the Harris-Benedict equation (HBE) underestimated measured TDEE by 23-24%. Our data suggest that increased energy intake reported by BED individuals is due to increased food consumption and not metabolic or under-reporting differences.
Authors:
Nancy C Raymond; Roseann E Peterson; Lindsay T Bartholome; Susan K Raatz; Michael D Jensen; James A Levine
Related Documents :
18563408 - Production of phycocyanin--a pigment with applications in biology, biotechnology, foods...
21883498 - Cats during gestation and lactation fed with canned food ad libitum: energy and protein...
20032448 - Intestinal macrophages involved in the homeostasis of the intestine have the potential ...
15927928 - Enhancing health benefits of berries through phenolic antioxidant enrichment: focus on ...
24153348 - The association of fast food consumption with poor dietary outcomes and obesity among c...
12144718 - Effect of timing of food deprivation on host resistance to fungal infection in mice.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2011-10-20
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1930-739X     ISO Abbreviation:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-03-28     Completed Date:  2012-07-03     Revised Date:  2014-01-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101264860     Medline TA:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  765-72     Citation Subset:  IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Basal Metabolism
Binge-Eating Disorder / complications*,  metabolism*,  physiopathology
Diet
Diet Records
Energy Intake*
Energy Metabolism*
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity / metabolism*,  physiopathology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DA26119/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; M01 RR000400/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; MO1-RR00400/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P30 DK 60456/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 MH 060199/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH060199/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Feeding History and Obese-Prone Genotype Increase Survival of Rats Exposed to a Challenge of Food Re...
Next Document:  One-year changes in symptoms of depression and weight in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 di...