Document Detail


Comparison of the histology and immunohistochemistry of vaccination-site and non-vaccination-site sarcomas from cats in New Zealand.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17928895     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS: To compare the histology and immunohistochemistry of vaccination-site sarcomas (VSSs) with non-vaccination-site sarcomas (NVSSs) in cats in New Zealand. To determine whether VSSs in cats in New Zealand have similar histological and immunohistochemical features to those previously described in feline vaccine-associated sarcomas (VASs) in North American studies. METHODS: A retrospective survey of skin biopsies submitted between 2004 and 2006 was performed to identify cutaneous sarcomas from both vaccination and non-vaccination sites in cats. Vaccination sites included the interscapular, shoulder, or dorsal or lateral cervical and thoracic regions. All sarcomas were examined histologically, and smooth muscle actin and desmin were assessed immunohistochemically. Features previously described in VASs were assessed and compared. RESULTS: Sarcomas from 34 cats were identified, 10 of which occurred at vaccination sites. Compared with NVSSs, VSSs were more likely to be located in the hypodermis and have greater cellular pleomorphism, higher mitotic rates, more frequent peripheral lymphocytic aggregates and multinucleated giant cells. VSSs were also more likely than NVSSs to show partial myofibroblastic differentiation, demonstrable using immunohistochemistry. The histological and immunohistochemical features of VSSs in cats in New Zealand are consistent with those previously described in VASs in cats in North America. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that VASs occur in cats in New Zealand. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The occurrence of VASs in cats in New Zealand would provide further support for restriction of the vaccination of cats to the minimum necessary to protect health, and adoption of the New Zealand Veterinary Association guidelines on vaccination.
Authors:
D Aberdein; J S Munday; C B Dyer; C G Knight; A F French; I R Gibson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  New Zealand veterinary journal     Volume:  55     ISSN:  0048-0169     ISO Abbreviation:  N Z Vet J     Publication Date:  2007 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-10-11     Completed Date:  2007-11-26     Revised Date:  2010-08-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0021406     Medline TA:  N Z Vet J     Country:  New Zealand    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  203-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand. d.aberdein@massey.ac.nz
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cat Diseases / epidemiology*,  etiology,  pathology
Cats
Female
Immunohistochemistry / veterinary
Male
New Zealand / epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sarcoma / epidemiology,  veterinary*
Skin / pathology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms / epidemiology,  veterinary*
United States / epidemiology
Vaccination / adverse effects,  veterinary*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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