Document Detail


Comparison of fat-free mass in super obesity (BMI ≥ 50 kg/m2) and morbid obesity (BMI <50 kg/m2) in response to different weight loss surgeries.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22118843     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Differences in excess weight loss, body mass index (BMI) change, and body composition have been related to different types of bariatric procedures. Our objective was to explore these alterations related to body mass in superobese (SO) and morbidly obese (MO) patients in a university hospital setting.
METHODS: Patients provided written informed consent and had their body composition measured before and after surgery using bioimpedance (Tanita 310). The t test was used to compare MO and SO. Pearson's correlations were used to examine the BMI, excessive BMI loss, percentage of body fat (BF) change, and fat-free mass.
RESULTS: A total of 133 MO patients had a BMI of 43.3 kg/m(2) and 88 SO patients had a BMI of 59.4 kg/m(2). The percentage of BF was 46.7% and 51.9% (P < .0001). The differences in the follow-up period after surgery (21.5 and 20.6 months; P = .62) and patient age (43.4 and 42.5 yr) were not significant, but the gender distribution was significant (P = .003). After surgery, the MO patients had a BMI of 30.9 ± 5.7 kg/m(2) and the SO patients had a BMI of 37.3 ± 9.0 kg/m(2). The percentage of BF was not different between the 2 groups (MO, 33.1% ± 9.6% and SO, 35.0% ± 12.4%; P = .21). Gender differences in the percentage of BF were present before surgery; however, after surgery, these were absent for the men in the 2 groups (24.8% and 26.6%; P = .51). The change in the BMI and the change in the BF had a stronger correlation for the MO patients (r = .83 versus r = .53) than for the SO patients. The fat-free mass loss correlated with the change in BMI without regard to procedure. The percentage of excessive BMI loss was 65.1% for the MO and 63.4% for the SO patients (P = .64).
CONCLUSIONS: The SO patients achieved excessive BMI loss similar to that of the MO patients, with more SO men choosing biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch. At a BMI of 37.3 kg/m(2), the SO patients had a percentage of BF that was not different from that of the MO patients at 30.9 kg/m(2). The fat-free mass losses correlated with the change in BMI.
Authors:
Gladys W Strain; Michel Gagner; Alfons Pomp; Gregory Dakin; William B Inabnet; Taha Saif
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2011-10-20
Journal Detail:
Title:  Surgery for obesity and related diseases : official journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery     Volume:  8     ISSN:  1878-7533     ISO Abbreviation:  Surg Obes Relat Dis     Publication Date:    2012 May-Jun
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-05-21     Completed Date:  2012-08-06     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101233161     Medline TA:  Surg Obes Relat Dis     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  255-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Weill Cornell College of Medicine, New York, New York 10065, USA. gls2010@med.cornell.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adipose Tissue / pathology*
Adult
Bariatric Surgery / methods*
Body Composition / physiology
Body Mass Index
Female
Humans
Laparoscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid / pathology,  surgery*
Weight Loss
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
UL1 TR000457/TR/NCATS NIH HHS; UL1-RR024996/RR/NCRR NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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