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Comparison of Dry-Land Training Programs Between Age Groups of Swimmers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23375633     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To describe the current use of dry-land training in swimmers by age category. DESIGN: Randomized sampling questionnaire. SETTING: Web-based survey. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-seven coaches from swim clubs throughout the United States. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dry-land training use, frequency, duration, mode of exercise, and exercise by body region in the following groups: ≤10 years, 11-14 years, 15-18 years, collegiate, and masters swimmers (≥18 years, noncollegiate). RESULTS: Among the surveyed coaches (n = 97), dry-land training use varied by swimmers' age (≤10 years [54%], 11-14 years [83%], 15-18 years [93%], collegiate [86%], and masters [26%]) and type of training modality (age ≤18 years [body weight exercises, stretching]; collegiate [free weight/machine weights and body weight exercises]; and masters [weight and cardiovascular training]). The most common body region exercised for all categories except masters was the spine/core, followed by the proximal leg, and then the shoulder. Masters swimmers focused on the shoulder region, followed by the spine. The primary reason for participation in dry-land training was injury prevention for all categories except masters. Limited practice time was the most common reason for not using dry-land training. CONCLUSIONS: A total of 50%-93% of swim coaches surveyed for all groups except masters incorporated some form of dry-land training; they used body weight exercises in younger swimmers. The focus of dry-land training among swimmers ≤18 years and collegiate swimmers was the spine/core. These findings may be used to develop future studies on how dry-land training contributes to performance or injuries, especially in the younger swimmer.
Authors:
Brian J Krabak; Kyle J Hancock; Shawn Drake
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-29
Journal Detail:
Title:  PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1934-1563     ISO Abbreviation:  PM R     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-2-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101491319     Medline TA:  PM R     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Rehabilitation, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Box 354740, Seattle, WA 98105; Seattle Children's Sports Medicine, Seattle WA . Electronic address: bkrabak@uw.edu.
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