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Common Pediatric Sports Injuries.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11387142     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This article reviews the common acute and overuse injuries encountered in the pediatric athlete. Acute injuries are usually physeal or avulsion fractures relating to a single traumatic event. Overuse injuries are the result of repetitive stress and include the common traction apophysitis, osteochondritis dissecans, and stress fractures. Sports-related injuries most frequently involve the lower extremity with injury patterns and frequencies relative to the athlete's age, size, and type of sport. Indeed, an alternative title for this review might be Òthe adolescent athlete as the changing biomechanics and psychosocial stresses of adolescence are inherent risk factors for sports-related injuries. An estimated seven million adolescents currently play high school sports with an increasing number becoming interested in extreme sports. It is hoped that this review will assist your future encounters with the injured pediatric athlete or Òweekend warrior.
Authors:
Sam T. Auringer; Evelyn Y. Anthony
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Seminars in musculoskeletal radiology     Volume:  3     ISSN:  1098-898X     ISO Abbreviation:  Semin Musculoskelet Radiol     Publication Date:  1999  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-Jun-1     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9717520     Medline TA:  Semin Musculoskelet Radiol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  247-256     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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