Document Detail


Colostrum avoidance, prelacteal feeding and late breast-feeding initiation in rural Northern Ethiopia.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21557873     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To identify specific cultural and behavioural factors that might be influenced to increase colostrum feeding in a rural village in Northern Ethiopia to improve infant health. DESIGN: Background interviews were conducted with six community health workers and two traditional birth attendants. A semi-structured tape-recorded interview was conducted with twenty mothers, most with children under the age of 5 years. Variables were: parental age and education; mother's ethnicity; number of live births and children's age; breast-feeding from birth through to weaning; availability and use of formula; and descriptions of colostrum v. other stages of breast milk. Participant interviews were conducted in Amharic and translated into English. SETTING: Kossoye, a rural Amhara village with high prevalence rates of stunting: inappropriate neonatal feeding is thought to be a factor. SUBJECTS: Women (20-60 years of age) reporting at least one live birth (range: 1-8, mean: ∼4). RESULTS: Colostrum (inger) and breast milk (yetut wotet) were seen as different substances. Colostrum was said to cause abdominal problems, but discarding a portion was sufficient to mitigate this effect. Almost all (nineteen of twenty) women breast-fed and twelve (63 %) reported ritual prelacteal feeding. A majority (fifteen of nineteen, 79 %) reported discarding colostrum and breast-feeding within 24 h of birth. Prelacteal feeding emerged as an additional factor to be targeted through educational intervention. CONCLUSIONS: To maximize neonatal health and growth, we recommend culturally tailored education delivered by community health advocates and traditional health practitioners that promotes immediate colostrum feeding and discourages prelacteal feeding.
Authors:
Nikki L Rogers; Jemilla Abdi; Dennis Moore; Sarah Nd'iangui; Linda J Smith; Andrew J Carlson; Dennis Carlson
Related Documents :
6481593 - Selective denervation of the s-a node in the treatment of progressive central vagal bra...
8038113 - Sudden unexpected nocturnal deaths among thai immigrant workers in singapore. the possi...
18539413 - Growth in high risk infants <1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks.
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-4-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  Public health nutrition     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1475-2727     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-5-11     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9808463     Medline TA:  Public Health Nutr     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  1-8     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
1Department of Community Health, Substance Abuse Resources and Disability Issues (SARDI) Program, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, 3171 Research Boulevard, Room 259, Dayton, OH 45420-4006, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Relationship of homestead food production with night blindness among children below 5 years of age i...
Next Document:  Young children's food in Liverpool day-care settings: a qualitative study of pre-school nutrition po...