Document Detail


Cognitive flexibility, central coherence and social emotional processing in males with an eating disorder.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23336111     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Objectives. Females are more likely to develop an eating disorder (ED) than males. Studies of affected men may therefore inform models of risk and resilience to EDs. The aim of this study was to examine putative neurocognitive intermediate phenotypes of EDs in affected males. Methods. Cognitive flexibility, central coherence (global/detail processing), complex emotion recognition and social-threat sensitivity were investigated in men with EDs and healthy men. Measures of distress, perfectionism, and obsessive compulsivity were collected. Results. Men with EDs were more cognitively inflexible across tasks and had more difficulty integrating global information than healthy men. Unexpectedly, there were no group differences on a visuospatial task of detail processing or on social-emotional processing tasks. Men with EDs had higher scores on measures of distress, perfectionism and obsessive compulsivity than healthy men. Conclusions. Men with EDs share some of the intermediate cognitive phenotype present in women with EDs. Like their female counterparts, males with EDs show an inflexible, fragmented cognitive style. However, relative to healthy men, men with EDs do not have superior detail processing abilities, poor emotion recognition or increased sensitivity to social-threat. It is possible that gender differences in social-threat processing contribute to the female preponderance of EDs.
Authors:
Elizabeth Goddard; Laura Carral-Fernández; Emma Denneny; Iain C Campbell; Janet Treasure
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  The world journal of biological psychiatry : the official journal of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1814-1412     ISO Abbreviation:  World J. Biol. Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-1-22     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101120023     Medline TA:  World J Biol Psychiatry     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry , London, UK.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Factors affecting self-reported use of seat belt among commercial vehicle drivers in Gusau metropoli...
Next Document:  Surfactant-free (mini)emulsion polymerization of n-BA/S stabilized by NaMMT: Films with improved wat...