Document Detail


Coeliac disease in a child with anorectal malformation: The importance of considering other causes of diarrhea.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21180503     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We present the case of an Indian child with a high anorectal malformation (ARM) who postoperatively had troublesome fecal incontinence. Based on a dietary history, weight loss, and diarrhea, a duodenal biopsy was performed that revealed coeliac disease. Since being on a gluten-free diet, her symptoms have improved dramatically. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report in the English literature of such an association between ARMs and coeliac disease. Dietary modification alone can dramatically improve symptoms in these children.
Authors:
Milan Gopal; Shawqui Nour; Wren Hoskyns
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1998-3891     ISO Abbreviation:  J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg     Publication Date:  2010 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-24     Completed Date:  2011-07-14     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101179870     Medline TA:  J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg     Country:  India    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  30-1     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Surgery, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester, LE1 5WW, UK.
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